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Frosty
05-31-2009, 10:58 PM
This is an interesting topic for me since many low carb advocates are against coconut oil for fat loss, yet there seems to be evidence that it may be supportive of fat loss. Mauro DiPasquale is against it because it bypasses normal "processing" of fats and not beneficial for the Anabolic Diet style of diet. However a discussion on this topic may be quite interesting. I haven't found any hardcore evidence of coconut oil or MCTs affecting thyroid function, so if anyone knows of evidence for this input would be greatly appreciated.








http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9806312

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of overfeeding on a high fat diet, enriched in coconut oil, and the influence of food restriction on the uncoupling protein (UCP1) expression and on body fat content.

DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: In experiment I, female Wistar rats were fed ad libitum either a normal-fat diet (control group, C) or a high-fat diet (HF), enriched in coconut oil, for 7 weeks. In experiment II, HF rats after finishing experiment I were fed (for 3 weeks) either the normal-fat diet (group CAHF, Control After High Fat) or food restricted diets which provided 60% of the energy intake of group CAHF: a group fed a low-energy, normal-fat diet (LENF) and another fed a low-energy, high-fat diet (LEHF).

MEASUREMENTS: Body and fatty depot weights. Food intake. Protein and UCP1 levels of interscapular brown adipose tissue.

RESULTS: High-fat diet feeding promoted an increase in body fat content, body weight and UCP1 levels. Energy restriction induced similar body weight reduction in groups LENF and LEHF. However, some adipose depots were more strongly reduced in the rats fed the high-fat diet enriched in coconut oil (group LEHF) than in the rats fed the normal-fat diet (Group LENF). Specific UCP1 was 2.0 (group LENF) and 3.4 (group LEHF) times higher than in controls (group CAHF).

CONCLUSION: The coconut-oil enriched diet is effective in stimulating UCP1 expression during ad libitum feeding and in preventing its down regulation during food restriction, and this goes hand in hand with a decrease of the white fat stores.

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Résumé / Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of medium chain triglycerides (MCT) vs long chain triglycerides (LCT) feeding on exogenous and endogenous oxidation of long chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFA) in women.

SUBJECTS: Twelve healthy female subjects (age 19-26y, body mass index (BMI) 17.5-28.6 kg/m2)

DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: In a randomized cross-over design, subjects were fed weight maintenance diets providing 15%, 45% and 40% of energy as protein, carbohydrate and fat, respectively, with 80% of this fat comprising either a combination of butter and coconut oil (MCT) or beef tallow (LCT). Following 6 days of feeding, subjects were given daily oral doses of 1-13C labelled-myristic, -palmitic and -stearic acids for 8 days. Expired 13CO2 was used as an index of LCSFA oxidation with CO2 production assessed by respiratory gas exchange.

RESULTS: No difference in exogenous LCSFA oxidation was observed as a function of diet on day 7. On day 14, greater combined cumulative fractional LCSFA oxidation (16.9 ±2.5%/5.5 h vs 9.1 ± 1.2%/5.5 h, P < 0.007), net LCSFA oxidation (2956±413 mg/5.5 h vs 1669±224 mg/5.5 h, P<0.01), and percentage dietary LCSFA contribution to total fat oxidation (16.3±2.3%/5.5 h vs 9.5±1.5%/5.5h; P< 0.01) were observed in women fed the MCT vs LCT diet. With the MCT diet, but not the LCT diet, combined cumulative fractional LCSFA oxidation (P< 0.03), net LCSFA oxidation (P< 0.03), and percentage dietary LCSFA contribution to total fat oxidation (P<0.02) were increased at day 14 as compared to day 7. Day 14 results indicated increased endogenous LCSFA oxidation during MCT feeding.

CONCLUSION: The capacity of MCT to increase endogenous oxidation of LCSFA suggests a role for MCT in body weight control over the long term.

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This one compares olive oil to MCT oil (which is the vast majority of the composition of coconut oil). This is surprising.

http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v11/n3/abs/oby200353a.html

Objective: The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of diets rich in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) or long-chain triglycerides (LCTs) on body composition, energy expenditure, substrate oxidation, subjective appetite, and ad libitum energy intake in overweight men.

Research Methods and Procedures: Twenty-four healthy, overweight men with body mass indexes between 25 and 31 kg/m2 consumed diets rich in MCT or LCT for 28 days each in a crossover randomized controlled trial. At baseline and after 4 weeks of each dietary intervention, energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry, and body composition was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging.

Results: Upper body adipose tissue (AT) decreased to a greater extent (p < 0.05) with functional oil (FctO) compared with olive oil (OL) consumption (-0.67 http://www.nature.com/__chars/plus/special/plusmn/black/med/base/glyph.gif 0.26 kg and -0.02 http://www.nature.com/__chars/plus/special/plusmn/black/med/base/glyph.gif 0.19 kg, respectively). There was a trend toward greater loss of whole-body subcutaneous AT volume (p = 0.087) with FctO compared with OL consumption. Average energy expenditure was 0.04 http://www.nature.com/__chars/plus/special/plusmn/black/med/base/glyph.gif 0.02 kcal/min greater (p < 0.05) on day 2 and 0.03 http://www.nature.com/__chars/plus/special/plusmn/black/med/base/glyph.gif 0.02 kcal/min (not significant) on day 28 with FctO compared with OL consumption. Similarly, average fat oxidation was greater (p = 0.052) with FctO compared with OL intake on day 2 but not day 28.

Discussion: Consumption of a diet rich in MCTs results in greater loss of AT compared with LCTs, perhaps due to increased energy expenditure and fat oxidation observed with MCT intake. Thus, MCTs may be considered as agents that aid in the prevention of obesity or potentially stimulate weight loss.

Frosty
05-31-2009, 11:06 PM
Here is a nice article:

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/132/3/329


ABSTRACT:
Medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) are readily oxidized in the liver. Animal and human studies have shown that the fast rate of oxidation of MCFA leads to greater energy expenditure (EE). Most animal studies have also demonstrated that the greater EE with MCFA relative to long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) results in less body weight gain and decreased size of fat depots after several months of consumption. Furthermore, both animal and human trials suggest a greater satiating effect of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) compared with long-chain triglycerides (LCT). The aim of this review is to evaluate existing data describing the effects of MCT on EE and satiety and determine their potential efficacy as agents in the treatment of human obesity. Animal studies are summarized and human trials more systematically evaluated because the primary focus of this article is to examine the effects of MCT on human energy metabolism and satiety. Hormones including cholescytokinin, peptide YY, gastric inhibitory peptide, neurotensin and pancreatic polypeptide have been proposed to be involved in the mechanism by which MCT may induce satiety; however, the exact mechanisms have not been established. From the literature reviewed, we conclude that MCT increase energy expenditure, may result in faster satiety and facilitate weight control when included in the diet as a replacement for fats containing LCT.

SlimTim
06-01-2009, 12:06 AM
YouTube - Muscle Meals With Evan Centopani Part 4 of 6

If you skip ahead on this video to around 7:10 Dave gives his opinion on coconut oil while on a diet with Evan and Guy. Very insightful and valid points about how the fats in coconut oil aren't essential, so its best to choose a fat source that includes essential fats while on a diet to maximize the fat calories that your taking in. He does however talk about the benefits of coconut oil in the offseason and in other applications

Frosty
06-01-2009, 12:09 AM
YouTube - Muscle Meals With Evan Centopani Part 4 of 6 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMvkXOd2dfA&feature=related)

If you skip ahead on this video to around 7:10 Dave gives his opinion on coconut oil while on a diet with Evan and Guy. Very insightful and valid points about how the fats in coconut oil aren't essential, so its best to choose a fat source that includes essential fats while on a diet to maximize the fat calories that your taking in. He does however talk about the benefits of coconut oil in the offseason and in other applications

Devil's advocate....macadamia nuts aren't essential fats, either. Nor is olive oil, or the fat found in beef or chicken.

Frosty
06-01-2009, 12:24 AM
One argument against coconut oil/MCTs is their preferential oxidation, where they would be preferentially oxidized over body fat. It's as to fat as table sugar is to carbohydrate.

However, if there are studies showing that it actually does decrease body fat, then what is going on? Is there something else happening that may increase body fat oxidation even though coconut oil/MCT would be preferentially oxidized?

Ondrea
06-02-2009, 07:44 PM
I have done a lot of reading up on coconut oil. Here are some great links. The site does talk about people on diets who have added coconut oil who have lost weight.


This explains the health benefits it has towards your thyroid and how it has helped those with a sluggish thyroid.
http://coconutoil.com/thyroid_health.htm


This explains how it got a bad rep in the first place and how it actually is very good for you, health wise and in regards to fat loss.
http://www.coconutoil.com/health_ben...oconut_oil.htm


This is the main site for those two links. The readings are long but they are very interesting. And most of the readings are written by doctors who have done much research on coconut oil, not just people writing reviews on it.
http://www.coconutoil.com/

And this is just a home rememdy site that explains many benefits of coconut oil and the ailments that it can help people overcome. There is a section where people talk about weight loss. Some have lost, some have not. But these are normal everyday people. For those who didn't lose, I do not know what their diet and lifestyle was like. They may have just added coconut oil to their already crappy diet but didn't really change any other eating habits.

http://earthclinic.com/Remedies/coconut_oil.html

Frosty
06-02-2009, 08:55 PM
Ondrea, have you seen any of the thyroid claims backed up with references? I hear a lot on coconut oil and thyroid, but I can never find any good references for it. I've read studies about increased energy expenditure, but not about increased thyroid function.

Ondrea
06-02-2009, 09:46 PM
Hmmmm...I have yet to find any real good ones. I'm like you, I do read a lot about people claiming it has helped their thyroid but I have yet to read a good scientific reference. Here are some claims by everyday people.

http://www.earthclinic.com/CURES/thyroid.html#COCONUTOIL

That first link I posted about thyroid and coconut oil talks about studies and research done on how pulyunsaturated fats and long chain fatty acids found in vegtable oils, which so many people use nowadays, cause so many people to have a sluggish thyroid and why the median chained fatty acids and saturated fat found in EVCO oil are better for you and your thyroid.

http://coconutoil.com/thyroid_health.htm

Frosty
06-02-2009, 09:56 PM
I remember reading one guy claiming that coconut oil was helping his thyroid, and his "proof" was that when he added coconut oil to his rice, his BP went up and some other things after the meal. Gee...I'm sure it couldn't have had anything to do with adding a saturated fat to a high GI carb :)

Ondrea
06-02-2009, 10:28 PM
Exactly, lots of these people do not tell us the whole story. Did they change the rest of their diet and did they start exercising?

Frosty
06-03-2009, 11:22 AM
I found this as a reference to coconut being stimulating to the thyroid in a Wikipedia article, but I can't understand what it's talking about:

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/120/11/1297.pdf

Is this actually any evidence? For me it looks totally unrelated.

freak
06-03-2009, 12:52 PM
I found this as a reference to coconut being stimulating to the thyroid in a Wikipedia article, but I can't understand what it's talking about:

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/120/11/1297.pdf

Is this actually any evidence? For me it looks totally unrelated.
if it is cited to a study then it is evidence but, you always want to go back to the primary source as it doesnt have any of the writer's bias... of course it is best if the study has been published in a peer-reviewed journal because they have been put through the wringer already.

Frosty
06-03-2009, 12:56 PM
I just totally don't see how the study relates to coconut oil when I read through it. Does anyone understand what the study means exactly?

freak
06-03-2009, 01:00 PM
I just totally don't see how the study relates to coconut oil when I read through it. Does anyone understand what the study means exactly?
its a study on how dietary fat influences thyroid function, not coconut oil.

Frosty
06-03-2009, 01:12 PM
From what I can gather, they used hydrogenated coconut oil and it reduced cAMP levels. But you can't extrapolate data from hydrogenated coconut oil to natural coconut oil since hydrogenated fats are known to cause metabolic mayhem.

Otherwise I see no evidence in this article to support this as a reference for coconut oil increasing thyroid function.

Frosty
06-03-2009, 01:21 PM
Hmm, I wonder..... since there is evidence that coconut oil increases post-prandial energy expenditure, I wonder if people just assume that means increase thyroid function?

Frosty
06-03-2009, 10:29 PM
Here's a question regarding carb loading and coconut oil.

Will it harm or benefit a carb load when on a keto style diet?

There are two sides of this....one side is the saturated fats will probably increase the insulin response with reducing insulin sensitivity, I'm thinking especially because coconut oil is quickly digested and used for energy meaning there will be a lot of the oil hitting the blood stream fast and high serum fats would decrease insulin sensitivity.

However on the other hand, would this preferential burning of coconut oil instead of preference for storage mean it's a good replacement for longer chain fats? Meaning if you kept fat the same otherwise, would coconut oil lead to less possible fat storage when loading than say, olive oil?

But then the other part of me says that even for a one day carb load when you're well fat adapted, the body has no problem burning fats for energy while it preferentially stores most of the carbs as glycogen for future use since there is a demand for them placed on the body by weight training.

Any ideas or thoughts? Any research that helps answer this?