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View Full Version : A case against broccoli?



Frosty
06-03-2009, 04:40 PM
This is an interesting article on the role of cruciferous vegetables in our diet and the goitrogens they contain. It's relevant to body composition. I think the conclusion would be against large intakes of things like broccoli like is often suggested, and taking a MUCH more moderated approach to these vegetables in terms of body composition:

"At low concentrations, the goitrogens in cabbage and other crucifers inhibit the uptake of iodine by the thyroid gland; this effect can be overcome by an increased dietary intake of iodine. At high concentrations, however, these chemicals inhibit the incorporation of iodine into thyroid hormone. In this case, even the iodine that makes it into the thyroid gland cannot be used; dietary iodine therefore cannot overcome the effect of very large amounts of crucifers.9"

http://westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/crucifers.html

Frosty
06-03-2009, 04:47 PM
Also interesting to note that other foods that contain goitrogens would be peanut butter, pine nuts, almonds, spinach, and soy products. In moderation I'm sure these are fine for people without thyroid problems, but think about a cutting diet that may contain lots of broccoli, spinach, almonds, and peanut butter....perhaps different vegetable choices may me wiser along with different fat sources such as olive oils, macadamia nuts/oil, and avocado, with peanuts and almonds being used less frequently.

At the very least, having a diet with enough iodine content and no more than moderate intake of cruciferous vegetables and other goitrogen-containing foods is wise when considering body composition.

Klaus Urine
06-14-2009, 04:11 PM
Interesting. This would suggest that my low calorie diet in conjunction with huge plates cruciferous veges was a bad idea.

Frosty
06-15-2009, 02:44 AM
Interesting. This would suggest that my low calorie diet in conjunction with huge plates cruciferous veges was a bad idea.


I used to eat a ton of broccoli, too :( Guess moderation is key here, not that they should be totally eliminated.