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TPT
07-20-2009, 06:25 PM
so bodybuilders are always speaking about injuries including back pain, knee pain, and of course- shoulder pain or dysfunction. well maybe the following paper by barlow et al. (2002) provides us more on why bodybuilders have shoulder problems.

the experimenters measured the strength and flexibility of bodybuilders and nonbodybuilders including other clinical tests. bodybuilders showed more overall inflexibility of the shoulder including significantly more decreased internal rotation. of course bodybuilders were stronger. however, bodybuiders were not stronger than nonbodybuilders for lower traps.

interesting right? this might indicate muscle imbalances that would contribute to shoulder dysfunction. also, 10 percent of bodybuilders were tested positive for shoulder impingement though reported no shoulder pathology. could these data indicate future problems for the bodybuilders?

we might set up muscle-strength imbalances inadvertantly by focusing on large muscles such pecs and not scapular stabilizers.

so who around here has shoulder problems?

Shoulder Strength and Range-Of-Motion Characteristics in Bodybuilders (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2002/08000/Shoulder_Strength_and_Range_Of_Motion.6.aspx)

BARLOW, JOSHUA C.; BENJAMIN, BRIAN W.; BIRT, PATRICK J.; HUGHES, CHRISTOPHER J.
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 16(3):367-372, August 2002.

values between bodybuilders and nonbodybuilders. Fifty-four men (29 bodybuilders and 25 no...





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Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder range-of-motion (ROM) and strength values between bodybuilders and nonbodybuilders. Fifty-four men (29 bodybuilders and 25 nonbodybuilders) between the ages of 21 and 34 years participated in the study. Goniometric measurements were used to assess shoulder flexion and internal and external rotation ROM. Isometric manual muscle tests were performed using a handheld dynamometer. Shoulder flexion, internal and external rotation, abduction, and prone shoulder retraction and elevation strength were tested. Independent t-tests were used to determine levels of statistical significance between the groups. Bodybuilders showed an overall loss of shoulder rotation ROM (166[degrees] vs. 180[degrees]) and a significantly decreased internal rotation ROM (-11[degrees]) compared with the control group. Bodybuilders were significantly stronger on all isometric shoulder-strength tests than nonbodybuilders, except for the assessment of lower trapezius strength when expressed as a percentage of body weight. The results of this study indicate that bodybuilders have imbalances regarding strength and ROM at the shoulder that may make them susceptible to shoulder pathology.
(C) 2002 National Strength and Conditioning Association

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ironwarrior22
07-20-2009, 06:51 PM
Very interesting better start working more specifically on scapular stabilizers and flexibility. I have always thought I should work on these areas but now I really want to. Thanks for this

TPT
07-20-2009, 10:34 PM
Very interesting better start working more specifically on scapular stabilizers and flexibility. I have always thought I should work on these areas but now I really want to. Thanks for this


no problem.

and yeah- prevention from future problems doesnt control our behaviors as much as immediate problems do. shoulder problems are quite prevalent in bodybuilders and prevention should be priority.

Frosty
07-21-2009, 02:00 PM
What's the best Rx for lower traps? Pullup and chinup variations?

TPT
07-21-2009, 11:08 PM
What's the best Rx for lower traps? Pullup and chinup variations?


lower traps depress and adduct/retract the scapulae. thus, in order to best isolate them we have to raise our arms overhead to about 145 degrees of abduction (in the line with the inferior fibers). sort or like flying or superman.

i've tested some bodybuilders while they did this in prone and they couldn't hold the position for long, adduct the scapula, or quickly "broke" when i applied a subtle downward force to their arms. pretty interesting.

their are different variations when using a load. e.g., front shoulder raises, thumbs up, while bringing the arms all the way up overhead.