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Frosty
11-09-2009, 11:00 PM
I've put on a good amount of weight recently and I'm just wondering if that can negatively affect blood pressure.

I haven't had mine measured, but it just seems like my pulse and blood pressure are higher than normal. My face tends to get red more, too. Especially when I tie my shoes.

Ryan Wacht
11-23-2009, 03:43 PM
I've put on a good amount of weight recently and I'm just wondering if that can negatively affect blood pressure.

I haven't had mine measured, but it just seems like my pulse and blood pressure are higher than normal. My face tends to get red more, too. Especially when I tie my shoes.

I think its common for BP to go up with weight gain, especially if you're on cycle and experience a lot of water retentention, which is when I first experienced this during my life. I would venture that many of the top pros and amateurs are on blood pressure meds.

nitrous
11-24-2009, 12:21 AM
hmm i'm noticing the same thing... thinking i'll up the cardio to deal with the blood pressure not too sure what im gonna do.. not even sure its high just sorta feel the same way as frosty

natron
11-24-2009, 12:35 AM
hmm i'm noticing the same thing... thinking i'll up the cardio to deal with the blood pressure not too sure what im gonna do.. not even sure its high just sorta feel the same way as frosty

Try celery seed exteact standerdized for 3nB content, I postd a thread here for the info.

And if your not sure, go to a walk in pharmacy, sit in the chair and take the test. It's free and takes 2 minutes

and if you do have high blood pressure, an increase in cardio is probably not the answer, especially high intensity cardio.

Vik
11-24-2009, 02:02 AM
Try celery seed exteact standerdized for 3nB content, I postd a thread here for the info.

And if your not sure, go to a walk in pharmacy, sit in the chair and take the test. It's free and takes 2 minutes

and if you do have high blood pressure, an increase in cardio is probably not the answer, especially high intensity cardio.

The cuff at the pharmacys are to small there for "regular" people arms I think they are for like 8-12 inch arm. I get mine tested at the doctors office I work at they have bigger cuffs they also sell the moniters pretty cheap with the bigger cuff.

TPT
11-24-2009, 02:10 AM
The cuff at the pharmacys are to small there for "regular" people arms I think they are for like 8-12 inch arm. I get mine tested at the doctors office I work at they have bigger cuffs they also sell the moniters pretty cheap with the bigger cuff.


the following might interest you.

high blood pressure? It could be the size of your arm - RX Muscle Forums

Frosty
11-24-2009, 10:06 AM
I remember when I was in the ambulance recently they had to get a bigger cuff to take my blood pressure.

TPT
11-24-2009, 12:06 PM
seems to be no differences between bodybuilders and controls.

Colan SD, Sanders SP, MacPherson D, Borow KM. Left ventricular diastolic function in elite athletes with physiologic cardiac hypertrophy. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1985;6:545–549.[Abstract] (http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/ijlink?linkType=ABST&journalCode=jacc&resid=6/3/545)


Fleck SJ, Dean LS. Resistance-training experience and the pressor response during resistance exercise. J Appl Physiol. 1987;63:116–120.[Abstract/Free Full Text] (http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/ijlink?linkType=ABST&journalCode=jap&resid=63/1/116)

Longhurst JC, Kelly AR, Gonyea WJ, Mitchell JH. Cardiovascular responses to static exercise in distance runners and weight lifters. J Appl Physiol. 1980;49:676–683.[Abstract/Free Full Text] (http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/ijlink?linkType=ABST&journalCode=jap&resid=49/4/676)
Longhurst JC, Kelly AR, Gonyea WJ, Mitchell JH. Chronic training with static and dynamic exercise: cardiovascular adaptation, and response to exercise. Circ Res. 1981;48(suppl I):I-171–I-178.


but, the following study by bertovic et al. (1999) suggeted differences. i.e., whole body arterial compliance was measured lower in strength-trained men than in age-matched controls. The caveat is that the differences in arterial compliance cant be attributed to differences in arterial pressure but rather due to intrinsic differences in the proximal aorta of strength-trained and sedentary men. Differences in aortic stiffness and aortic impedance were shown between groups.

http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/33/6/1385
Muscular Strength Training Is Associated With Low Arterial Compliance and High Pulse Pressure

David A. Bertovic; Tamara K. Waddell; Christoph D. Gatzka; James D. Cameron; Anthony M. Dart; Bronwyn A. Kingwell


From the Alfred and Baker Medical Unit, Baker Medical Research Institute, Prahran, and the Department of Electronic Engineering, Latrobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (J.D.C.), Australia.

Correspondence to Dr Bronwyn Kingwell, Alfred and Baker Medical Unit, Baker Medical Research Institute, Commercial Rd, Prahran 3181, Australia. E-mail bronwyn.kingwell@baker.edu.au (bronwyn.kingwell@baker.edu.au) Abstract—Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure, but the effects of muscular strength training on arterial mechanical properties are unknown. We compared blood pressure, whole body arterial compliance, aortic impedance, aortic stiffness (measured by ß-index and carotid pulse pressure divided by normalized systolic expansion [Ep]), pulse wave velocity, and left ventricular parameters in 19 muscular strength–trained athletes (mean±SD age, 26±4 years) and 19 sedentary controls (26±5 years). Subjects were healthy, non-steroid-using, nonsmoking males, and athletes had been engaged in a strength-training program with no aerobic component for a minimum of 12 months. There was no difference in maximum oxygen consumption between groups, but handgrip strength (mean±SEM, 44±2 versus 56±2 kg; P<0.01) and left ventricular mass (168±8 versus 190±8 g; P<0.05) were greater in athletes. Arterial stiffness was higher in athletes, as evidenced by lower whole body arterial compliance (0.40±0.04 versus 0.54±0.04 arbitrary compliance units; P=0.01), higher aortic characteristic impedance (1.55±0.13 versus 1.18±0.08 mm Hg · s · cm-1; P<0.05), ß-index (4.6±0.2 versus 3.8±0.4; P<0.05), and ln Ep (10.86±0.06 versus 10.60±0.08; P<0.01). Femoral–dorsalis pedis pulse wave velocity was also higher in the athletes, but carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was not different. Furthermore, both carotid (56±3 versus 44±2 mm Hg; P<0.001) and brachial (60±3 versus 50±2 mm Hg; P<0.01) pulse pressures were higher in the athletes, but mean arterial pressure and resting heart rate did not differ between groups. These data indicate that both the proximal aorta and the leg arteries are stiffer in strength-trained individuals and contribute to a higher cardiac afterload.

TPT
11-24-2009, 12:07 PM
and i am not speaking to strength-trained subjects with use of aas. thats a whole other story!

homegrown
01-08-2010, 01:18 PM
I had gained about 60 pounds in the span or 4 months and got my pressure tested at the chiro office i went to.. 190/87 was the verdict.. I panicked!! Went to my doctor and thought i was gonna stroke out lifting... Needless to say i will not be going back to that chiro. My BP was 113/71.. I have big arms and the cuffs they used were to small.. He also tried to sell me his supplements (CoQ10) that BP is borderline heart attack waiting to happen.. So i dont trust him at all needless to say.. But in 335, not a bad BP for some one of that weight

s2h
01-09-2010, 11:37 PM
yeah i have to use the big cuff to get accurate reading but AAS and wieght gainn will icrease your BP in most people,if your BP rises like mine did get a scrip from your doc,i recommend micardis at 40mg it doesnt have a diuretic in it so you dont get all dryed out which doesnt help your BP either.