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natron
12-04-2009, 02:43 PM
A good read for those interested

http://www.mindandmuscle.net/articles/chris-clancey/sprinting-1

natron
12-04-2009, 04:37 PM
A few reasons I am behind this is the nutrient partitioning and the quickness of the cardio. Not only do I find it more effective, It's also alot more convenient for me.

I will point out I don't do any sprints in the winter, but I do in the summer. My cardio is only a 5 minute warm up, 10 minutes of sprints, 5 minute cool down. Quick and very effective.

Here is part two to the article

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/par48.htm

natron
12-04-2009, 07:38 PM
I'm a big believer in caloric expenditure throughout the day, rather than the amount of calories burned per cardio session. This is where I believe HIIT style cardio, sprints and "dead cardio" or "clean cardio" are the best of the best.

Not only do they increase power and endurance, they also increase nutrient partitioning, which is of huge importance in gaining lean muscle mass.

Not only do I feel these forms of cardio are superior in fat loss, they also get you out of the gym quicker, which, at least to me, is very beneficial.



Harmer et al. demonstrated that seven weeks of sprint training (3 sessions per/week) enhanced maximal sprint-peak power, lengthened time to exhaustion at maximal sprint-exertion, lowered blood-pressure, and increased incremental VO2 peak during exertion in healthy male subjects as a result of increased glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activity (11)
Sprint-training directly augments full-body glycogen storage-potential via cellular and enzymatic mechanisms while increasing GLUT4 translocation (and subsequently insulin-stimulated glucose transport) in large systems of both lower and upper-body skeletal muscle (12,13). In addition, repeated bouts of sprint-like exertion will generate higher levels of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) synthesis in muscle too (14). All told, sprint-training literally makes you more carb-sensitive in regards to your daily glucose intake, ensuring that more of carbs will be partitioned and stored in your muscles.
In fact, sprinting is quite likely the single most effective form of exercise in terms of increasing NRF-1 binding activity in skeletal muscle (5, 6, 14, and 15). What’s so great about NRF-1 (or maybe it’s just "what the hell is NRF-1")? Allow me to explain then. Essentially, NRF-1 is a transcription factor protein that acts on nuclear genes by encoding respiratory subunits and creating components of the cellular machinery that actually transcribe and replicate mitochondria (14, 15).

NRF-1, in conjunction with NRF-2 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1alpha (PCG-1) basically work together to provide your muscles with the stimuli for adaptive cellular overhauls in response to exercise by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis so that your skeletal muscle contains not only more mitochondria, but also larger mitochondria (16). This obviously has tremendous ramifications for nutrient partitioning. First and foremost is the fact that larger mitochondrial surface area means more CPT availability. Another is that increased PCG-1 activity means that PPAR activation in the peroxisomes is also being positively augmented (17).


Hopefully, even those of you with no intellectual ambitions when it comes to cellular biology can see from the above that sprint-training has tremendously positive ramifications for fat-burning, both directly and indirectly. For one, AMPk activation promotes fatty-acid oxidation by inhibiting acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) levels which is a key enzymatic player when it comes to synthesizing malonyl-CoA, the coenzyme which deactivates CPT in the mitochondria (18,19,20). So through sprint-training, we basically create a metabolic scenario allowing us to "run the gamut" on fat-oxidation.

We activate AMPk to reduce ACC activity in order to naturally optimize CPT-assisted mitochondrial FFA-oxidation as best we can, while simultaneously stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis, which gives us more mitochondria with more CPT to work with, allowing for an even greater rate of FFA-oxidation. But wait, it gets even better. As I just mentioned a few sentences back, sprinting also provides us with that spike in PCG-1 activity which—although relatively transient—will further potentiate glucose and FFA oxidation in the peroxisomes (17).
At the same time, it is highly probable that sprinting-evoked, systemic AMPk activation simultaneously curtails an individual’s natural genetic propensity for fat-storage as well. This is because, in response to the rapid ATP-depletion prompted by those repeated, maximal-intensity bouts of anaerobic expenditure, AMPk also works to curtail Acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT1) activity and glucose uptake into adipocytes. This saves ATP for energy repletion rather than having it be "misallocated" to synthesize new triacylglycerol (TAG) in your adipocytes (21, 22, 23). I desperately want to write something witty here, but—to be perfectly honest—the above dynamic still strikes me as so miraculous that it generally tends to leave me at a loss for words whenever I go back and re-conceptualize it. But, trust me, it’s "pretty good" to have this going on, which just goes to show how potent a physique-shaping force sprinting can be when it comes to furthering your bodybuilding goals.

This topic is now open for scrutiny and or debate...

natron
12-04-2009, 07:39 PM
I'm a big believer in caloric expenditure throughout the day, rather than the amount of calories burned per cardio session. This is where I believe HIIT style cardio, sprints and "dead cardio" or "clean cardio" are the best of the best.

Not only do they increase power and endurance, they also increase nutrient partitioning, which is of huge importance in gaining lean muscle mass.

Not only do I feel these forms of cardio are superior in fat loss, they also get you out of the gym quicker, which, at least to me, is very beneficial.



Harmer et al. demonstrated that seven weeks of sprint training (3 sessions per/week) enhanced maximal sprint-peak power, lengthened time to exhaustion at maximal sprint-exertion, lowered blood-pressure, and increased incremental VO2 peak during exertion in healthy male subjects as a result of increased glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activity (11)
Sprint-training directly augments full-body glycogen storage-potential via cellular and enzymatic mechanisms while increasing GLUT4 translocation (and subsequently insulin-stimulated glucose transport) in large systems of both lower and upper-body skeletal muscle (12,13). In addition, repeated bouts of sprint-like exertion will generate higher levels of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) synthesis in muscle too (14). All told, sprint-training literally makes you more carb-sensitive in regards to your daily glucose intake, ensuring that more of carbs will be partitioned and stored in your muscles.
In fact, sprinting is quite likely the single most effective form of exercise in terms of increasing NRF-1 binding activity in skeletal muscle (5, 6, 14, and 15). What’s so great about NRF-1 (or maybe it’s just "what the hell is NRF-1")? Allow me to explain then. Essentially, NRF-1 is a transcription factor protein that acts on nuclear genes by encoding respiratory subunits and creating components of the cellular machinery that actually transcribe and replicate mitochondria (14, 15).

NRF-1, in conjunction with NRF-2 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor co-activator 1alpha (PCG-1) basically work together to provide your muscles with the stimuli for adaptive cellular overhauls in response to exercise by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis so that your skeletal muscle contains not only more mitochondria, but also larger mitochondria (16). This obviously has tremendous ramifications for nutrient partitioning. First and foremost is the fact that larger mitochondrial surface area means more CPT availability. Another is that increased PCG-1 activity means that PPAR activation in the peroxisomes is also being positively augmented (17).


Hopefully, even those of you with no intellectual ambitions when it comes to cellular biology can see from the above that sprint-training has tremendously positive ramifications for fat-burning, both directly and indirectly. For one, AMPk activation promotes fatty-acid oxidation by inhibiting acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) levels which is a key enzymatic player when it comes to synthesizing malonyl-CoA, the coenzyme which deactivates CPT in the mitochondria (18,19,20). So through sprint-training, we basically create a metabolic scenario allowing us to "run the gamut" on fat-oxidation.

We activate AMPk to reduce ACC activity in order to naturally optimize CPT-assisted mitochondrial FFA-oxidation as best we can, while simultaneously stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis, which gives us more mitochondria with more CPT to work with, allowing for an even greater rate of FFA-oxidation. But wait, it gets even better. As I just mentioned a few sentences back, sprinting also provides us with that spike in PCG-1 activity which—although relatively transient—will further potentiate glucose and FFA oxidation in the peroxisomes (17).
At the same time, it is highly probable that sprinting-evoked, systemic AMPk activation simultaneously curtails an individual’s natural genetic propensity for fat-storage as well. This is because, in response to the rapid ATP-depletion prompted by those repeated, maximal-intensity bouts of anaerobic expenditure, AMPk also works to curtail Acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT1) activity and glucose uptake into adipocytes. This saves ATP for energy repletion rather than having it be "misallocated" to synthesize new triacylglycerol (TAG) in your adipocytes (21, 22, 23). I desperately want to write something witty here, but—to be perfectly honest—the above dynamic still strikes me as so miraculous that it generally tends to leave me at a loss for words whenever I go back and re-conceptualize it. But, trust me, it’s "pretty good" to have this going on, which just goes to show how potent a physique-shaping force sprinting can be when it comes to furthering your bodybuilding goals.

This topic is now open for scrutiny and or debate...

Youngguns
12-04-2009, 07:42 PM
I agree totally. I'm sick of an hour on the treadmil simply walking. It's a waste of time, and it's broing.

natron
12-04-2009, 07:44 PM
I also have studies showing an increase in blood flow, blood capacity etc. I believe the number was an increase of 18%.

Now, I now alot of us here talk about getting blood into the muscle, so to speak. Also about nutrients such as simple carbs etc being drawn in to the muscles, why these are hardly scientific explanations, 18% increase should ring a bell to most here.

Imagine increasing these capabilities by 18% long term, this would make a huge difference in ones physique.

I'm keen to nutrient partitioning, because it works, just like insulin in this fact.

GirlyMuscle
12-04-2009, 07:47 PM
I'm liking these posts natron because I'm the type of person who likes to know WHY I'm doing something. That being said I have poor attention span when it comes to reading. That's why I can't get through the scientific articles. I like when you explain them in layman's terms. Thanks!

natron
12-04-2009, 07:48 PM
I agree totally. I'm sick of an hour on the treadmil simply walking. It's a waste of time, and it's broing.

Exactly! Not only that, it's only minimally effective at reducing body fat mass.

Think about it, we want the best creatine, the fastest carb, the purest protein, legit/strong steroids right? But we don't even consider the best form of exercise? Makes little to no sense to me.

I'll tell you one thing though, I do cardio 2-3 times per week, for 10-20 minutes, and I'm lean all the time. Even when I bulk, I remain in very good condition, and I promise you this isnt from 45 minutes of walking per day.

natron
12-04-2009, 07:50 PM
I'm liking these posts natron because I'm the type of person who likes to know WHY I'm doing something. That being said I have poor attention span when it comes to reading. That's why I can't get through the scientific articles. I like when you explain them in layman's terms. Thanks!

I try to offer both sides. For me the practical application is exciting, and so is the science, but you cant help people spouting science all the time. So we need both.

Andrew732
12-05-2009, 01:59 AM
In my experience, sprinting is the best form of cardio.

GirlyMuscle
12-05-2009, 02:21 AM
Dave's philosophy is that to do HIIT cardio you need carbs. If you're going keto, no HIIT. Do you agree?

natron
12-05-2009, 02:30 AM
Dave's philosophy is that to do HIIT cardio you need carbs. If you're going keto, no HIIT. Do you agree?

Not necessarily, no. I'm assuming you mean carbs pre/intra/post??? Or at least one of those?

I'm sorry, I need more info, to be completely honest, I do not follow Daves work.

DAVIDHARDY
02-26-2010, 02:37 PM
Not necessarily, no. I'm assuming you mean carbs pre/intra/post??? Or at least one of those?

I'm sorry, I need more info, to be completely honest, I do not follow Daves work.


Dave is a straight keto guy, so HIIT would be disastrous during his diet, so he relys on low intensity, long duration cardio. However, if you wanted to remain on a ketogenic diet and do HIIT training, if you used carbohydrates to fuel the cardio session, you would be good. In theory, you could get the best of both worlds by following a TKD rather than Dave's diet.

G-Roy
02-26-2010, 03:17 PM
natron, Ive always been a little fuzzy on carb intake before HIIT cardio. I read in you log you take some carbs. How much is appropriate and does it matter if its afternoon cardio rather than a.m. cardio in terms of carbs?

G-Roy
02-26-2010, 03:17 PM
Dave is a straight keto guy, so HIIT would be disastrous during his diet, so he relys on low intensity, long duration cardio. However, if you wanted to remain on a ketogenic diet and do HIIT training, if you used carbohydrates to fuel the cardio session, you would be good. In theory, you could get the best of both worlds by following a TKD rather than Dave's diet.

do you have experience with any CKD diets? I've done dr dipasquales AD for bodybuilders but there is no room for supplemental carbs for HIIT cardio. ANy suggestions?

G-Roy
03-16-2010, 03:52 PM
natron, Ive always been a little fuzzy on carb intake before HIIT cardio. I read in you log you take some carbs. How much is appropriate and does it matter if its afternoon cardio rather than a.m. cardio in terms of carbs?

bump

ob205
03-17-2010, 12:21 PM
I think sprints are great, also there is some evidence that doing sprints as opposed to slow steady state cardio can actually convert slow twitch fibers to FAST. I heard it on Superhuman Radio, it was a great show. The coach on also stated if you want a kid to be a terrible athlete have him train to be a long distance runner.

As for carbs, I don't think it's necessary on a mixed diet to have carbs prior to the sprint session, this would defeat the purpose. From what I understand the idea behind KETO diets only wanting to do low intensity cardio is to try to only access fat as the key energy component, the research shows that at lower intensities higher % of fat is used for energy as opposed to higher intensity which will burn glycogen/glucose. I think they also fear that the high intensity will burn muscle for fuel, which it may.

These are my thoughts, like this discussion and hearing what others think as well.