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Yolo
12-14-2009, 01:28 AM
I've recently come across an interesting blog post (http://www.jonathanfields.com/blog/brain-buff-research-thoughts-on-strength-fitness-weight-loss/) that quotes a study performed by Erin M. Shackell and Lionel G. Standing at Bishop’s University which states that, by merely visualizing workouts, subjects had a nearly equal gain in strength as those who actually followed a training protocol.

Personally, I feel this is too good to be true on the one hand, and can also provide a rather distasteful excuse for those who are too lazy to go to the gym. What do you guys think? Do you know of this study?

(My apologies if this is old news and/or too sensationalistic for this section)

jack08son
12-14-2009, 08:47 AM
Have the people who conducted this study visualize squatting 600 pounds and see if it happens...

You'll only get there by HARD TRAINING! People are always looking for an easy way out!

Yolo
12-14-2009, 08:49 AM
Have the people who conducted this study visualize squatting 600 pounds and see if it happens...


LOL!! You, sir, make a very strong argument.

*RedStar*
12-14-2009, 09:35 AM
I believe this to some degree, the brain is such an amazing and powerful tool..

juiceinator3000
12-14-2009, 09:46 AM
sounds like levrone helped them with this

Frosty
12-14-2009, 12:27 PM
Have the people who conducted this study visualize squatting 600 pounds and see if it happens...

You'll only get there by HARD TRAINING! People are always looking for an easy way out!


No doubt on the last statement, but the first one seems to insinuate that it is worthless. I mean if I said caffeine helps with fat loss and you say "well have the people that conducted the study visualize losing 80 lbs and see if it happens right away".....that wouldn't make sense.

jack08son
12-14-2009, 01:11 PM
No doubt on the last statement, but the first one seems to insinuate that it is worthless. I mean if I said caffeine helps with fat loss and you say "well have the people that conducted the study visualize losing 80 lbs and see if it happens right away".....that wouldn't make sense.

I don't want to say visualization is worthless because it isn't, given you are working out while visualizing. Visualizing the workout and not working out TO ME does seem worthless.

Youngguns
12-14-2009, 01:44 PM
Visualization is HUGE. Being in the wrong mindset for a big lift could possibly decrease your workout by 25+%, or increase 25+%.

For example I'm doing DB shoulder presses, 75 goes up for 8, pretty hard, 80's are next. I tell myself over and over how easier it's going to be and that there's no problem at all "light weight" they go up, I pump out 8 with ease compared to the 75's. That's visualization.

tmno
05-15-2011, 04:27 AM
i guess to some degree visualization works but like they say no pain no gain.. ive heard of this kind of study and this helps if the person is injured and cannot do any heavy workouts. But I highly doubt that it gives nearly the same strength result as a normal workout routine

78up
12-18-2011, 08:53 AM
I read a book called super squats that recommended visualizing the 20 rep squat set before actually doing it. It defiantly helps me focus when I do it. I havent done the 20 rep squats in a while, so I only visualize the last set and only on squats.

juggies
12-18-2011, 09:02 AM
I definitely visualize on squats. Between sets I sit down and visualize, think how I will look, and what motion I'll be doing. Sometimes I even count out the reps in my mind.

I'm not sure it helps everyone, but I'll keep doing it...

mareck
07-28-2012, 07:53 PM
when i had my knee surgery i was stuck in bed and visualized my workouts all day and a month later i managed to take 12th in the region at my powerlifting meet. visualization can't be complete bs

PhiJ
08-05-2012, 04:37 PM
Surely this could all be mental: maybe the guys in the study got stronger because of their minds not their muscles.

If none of them had used the hip flexor machine before then the ones who practised and the ones who visualised doing it will both end up in a better mental state for doing the exercise.

You know, they'll go up to the machine, know that they have to pull hard and they'll be quite well pracised at willing themselves to pull hard.
The guys in the control group won't have had that pracise, so will be just as good (mentally) at the end as they are at the beginning.