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HeavyDutyGuy
04-10-2010, 04:23 PM
OK one more for now. Cant give ALL my stuff away at once....
Research conducted by Roux-Lanhge indicated the following: Only when a muscle performs with greatest power, ie, through overcoming a greater resistance than before in a unit of time, will it's functional cross section need to increase...Hypertrophy is seen only in muscles that perform a great amount of work in a unit time (Lange, Ueber Funktionelle Anpassung USW, Berlin, Julius Springer, 1917) Further research by Petow and Siebert put a finer point on the intensity issue "Hypertrophy results from an increase in intensity of work done, whereas the total amount of work is without significance" W Siebert and H. Petow, Studien uber Arbeitshypertrophie des Muskels, Z. Klin Medl, 102, 427-433, 1925) Research conducted by Arthur H Steinhaus stated: Only when intensity is increaesed does hyperrophy follow." (A Steinhaus, The Journal of the Association for Physical and Mental Rehabilitation, Vol 9 No 5 Sep -OCt 1955, 147-150).

Baldiewonkanobi
04-10-2010, 07:20 PM
("Hypertrophy results from an increase in intensity of work done, whereas the total amount of work is without significance")

Wow...now that will fuck with a bunch of Bodybuilding paradigms.....


Baldie

medium195
04-12-2010, 07:44 PM
("Hypertrophy results from an increase in intensity of work done, whereas the total amount of work is without significance")

Wow...now that will fuck with a bunch of Bodybuilding paradigms.....


Baldie

it also says 'work in a unit of time'. so wouldnt more work (in the same time unit) induce hypertrophy?

meaning, if the time between the first rep of my first set and the last rep of the last set was 10 minutes, but next time i do one extra set in the same amount of time, is that more intense? would that induce hypertrophy - even if the weights used are the same?

Baldiewonkanobi
04-12-2010, 11:48 PM
James get out your weegie board and see if you can conjur up MM and answer this one.....


Baldie

esplendido
04-13-2010, 01:27 AM
OK one more for now. Cant give ALL my stuff away at once....
Research conducted by Roux-Lanhge indicated the following: Only when a muscle performs with greatest power, ie, through overcoming a greater resistance than before in a unit of time, will it's functional cross section need to increase...Hypertrophy is seen only in muscles that perform a great amount of work in a unit time (Lange, Ueber Funktionelle Anpassung USW, Berlin, Julius Springer, 1917) Further research by Petow and Siebert put a finer point on the intensity issue "Hypertrophy results from an increase in intensity of work done, whereas the total amount of work is without significance" W Siebert and H. Petow, Studien uber Arbeitshypertrophie des Muskels, Z. Klin Medl, 102, 427-433, 1925) Research conducted by Arthur H Steinhaus stated: Only when intensity is increaesed does hyperrophy follow." (A Steinhaus, The Journal of the Association for Physical and Mental Rehabilitation, Vol 9 No 5 Sep -OCt 1955, 147-150).
I'm guessing newer research has expanded on this and identified other ways to increase intensity.....

axioma
04-13-2010, 12:22 PM
My last post in my thread was along those lines...short duration workout, with moderate load and super high intensity=can't walk today.

HeavyDutyGuy
04-13-2010, 07:49 PM
it also says 'work in a unit of time'. so wouldnt more work (in the same time unit) induce hypertrophy?

meaning, if the time between the first rep of my first set and the last rep of the last set was 10 minutes, but next time i do one extra set in the same amount of time, is that more intense? would that induce hypertrophy - even if the weights used are the same?
Thats implied in the statement. so yes- but there are limits to how much work- how much weight, how many reps, how mant sets you can can do in the same time interval. I think they were talking shorter tiem intervals- but yeah- lets take he 10 minute one. If you can do say 4 sets of squats in that time, and 5 - same weight, reps, form - SPEED OF MOVEMENT then it you did more work in that unit of time. but say you are squatting 500 for 10 good reps- how many times can you do that in 10 mins? there are limits- but it comes down to how much quality work you can do-while still going heavy enough to stimulate the deep fibers. It comes down- and back to PROGRESSION- more weight, more reps, etc in the same time- without throwing the weights is going to be more intense. HOw many sets you do- its really up to you. Dorian did one,Kai does- chit I dont even know-but both are intense mothers with huge muscles..

Sandpig
04-14-2010, 08:38 AM
I think there are a lot of people who will disagree with this.There are a lot of big ass people who do not train in this manner.
I honestly believe there's more than one way to skin the cat, so to speak.

HeavyDutyGuy
04-14-2010, 02:23 PM
Most bodybuilders train with large amounts of work per unit time...

mr intensity
04-14-2010, 04:43 PM
I think there are a lot of people who will disagree with this.There are a lot of big ass people who do not train in this manner.
I honestly believe there's more than one way to skin the cat, so to speak.

for example if john
brings up his wts from

bench press 135 x 10 to 405 x 10
deadlifts 185 x 10 to 500 x 10
squats 135 x 10 to 500 x 10
barbell rows 100 x 10 to 350 x 10

in say 5 years while doing the same exercises week after week...won`t he have a lot of muscle mass ?

"heavier"training week after week is responsible for muscle growth. Muscle growth is a protective mechanism, whenever a muscle is taxed to 100 percent failure all it tries to do is to grow bigger and stronger to protect itself from the same load next time.....now when the muscle has adapted (bigger and stronger than before)...only "heavier" training than before will be able to tax the muscle again to undergo the same protective adaptation mechanism.