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TPT
04-20-2010, 06:02 PM
activation of medial deltoid was significantly greater during free weight bench press than during the smith machine bench press.

instability caused by the free weight bench press likely sets up greater responses by the medial deltoid as force generation and stabilizere of the humerus within the glenoid cavity.

interestingly, no differences in muscle activation were found between anterior detls and the pecs betweem smith machine and free weight bench presses. i wonder whether emg activation would be found if the triceps were measured.


A Comparison of Muscle Activation Between a Smith Machine and Free Weight Bench Press (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Fulltext/2010/03000/A_Comparison_of_Muscle_Activation_Between_a_Smith. 26.aspx)

Schick, Evan E; Coburn, Jared W; Brown, Lee E; Judelson, Daniel A; Khamoui, Andy V; Tran, Tai T; Uribe, Brandon P
The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 24(3):779-784, March 2010.
doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181cc2237

Abstract:

Schick, EE, Coburn, JW, Brown, LE, Judelson, DA, Khamoui, AV, Tran, TT, and Uribe, BP. A comparison of muscle activation between a Smith machine and free weight bench press. J Strength Cond Res 24(3): 779-784, 2010-The bench press exercise exists in multiple forms including the machine and free weight bench press. It is not clear though how each mode differs in its effect on muscle activation. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the anterior deltoid, medial deltoid, and pectoralis major during a Smith machine and free weight bench press at lower (70% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and higher (90% 1RM) intensities. Normalized electromyography amplitude values were used during the concentric phase of the bench press to compare muscle activity between a free weight and Smith machine bench press. Participants were classified as either experienced or inexperienced bench pressers. Two testing sessions were used, each of which entailed either all free weight or all Smith machine testing. In each testing session, each participant's 1RM was established followed by 2 repetitions at 70% of 1RM and 2 repetitions at 90% of 1RM. Results indicated greater activation of the medial deltoid on the free weight bench press than on the Smith machine bench press. Also, there was greater muscle activation at the 90% 1RM load than at the 70% 1RM load. The results of this study suggest that strength coaches should consider choosing the free weight bench press over the Smith machine bench press because of its potential for greater upper-body muscular development.
(C) 2010 National Strength and Conditioning Association

HeavyDutyGuy
05-16-2010, 11:28 PM
Greater activation of the medial deltoid? Are not bench presses usually done for developing the pecs??

joe d
05-18-2010, 09:44 AM
i have yet to find a good use for the smith machine other than to hang my stuff on it.

ths study makes no sense. it could possibly suggest that the smith is better since it relies less on the delts but then they go to say that is the reason to use free weights lol. at least they suggest to use free weights.

ob205
05-18-2010, 11:48 AM
My interpretation is - You can still use the smith machine and it will effectively target said muscle groups, just slightly less effectively. No big shock there that stabilizer muscles were more involved in a FREE weight exercise. What I really dislike about smith machines is the locked pattern of movement. I don't believe any straight lines exist in nature, so why try to work them into an exercise pattern. I did see one form of smith that had a free moving bar, which was pretty inventive.

joe d
05-18-2010, 01:46 PM
My interpretation is - You can still use the smith machine and it will effectively target said muscle groups, just slightly less effectively. No big shock there that stabilizer muscles were more involved in a FREE weight exercise. What I really dislike about smith machines is the locked pattern of movement. I don't believe any straight lines exist in nature, so why try to work them into an exercise pattern. I did see one form of smith that had a free moving bar, which was pretty inventive.

thats the jones. its better but still worthless

p.s.
06-06-2010, 12:01 PM
i have yet to find a good use for the smith machine other than to hang my stuff on it.

ths study makes no sense. it could possibly suggest that the smith is better since it relies less on the delts but then they go to say that is the reason to use free weights lol. at least they suggest to use free weights.Just wait till you've been at this for 20+ years and you'll find that certain free wait exercises have to be replaced with machines (including the smith machine) due to shoulder issues etc.

Lex29us
06-23-2010, 10:26 AM
I gotta agree with P.S.
Free weights are great muscle builders because they not only work the muscle group being trained, but also the stabalizer muscles needed to keep the weight being moved on track. So in the instance of Bench Press Free vs smith, with the free weight movement, the delts, tri's and pecs all come into effect. However like P.S. stated, if you've ever had a shoulder injury, or are a more "senior" gym rat, its a lot easier to injure or reinjure yourself with the bench. So in order to continue making gains, but illiminating the risk factor many choose the smith over the free weight exercise. The free weight movement may limit the range a motion slightly, and may take a minute to line up correctly, but you can still make effective gains doing smith benches, smith shoulder presses, and smith squats.

Every exercise is not meant for every body type. What works for some wont work for all. Experimentation is key.
Peace!

shawncathey
06-27-2010, 02:44 AM
i like using both. when im good and carbed up and loose il do free weights with super strict form...and if i really want to isolate a muscle and not have to worry about lifting and balancing il utilize the smith or a machine. roelly winklaar looks like he only uses machines and he is pumped!

joe d
06-30-2010, 07:32 PM
Just wait till you've been at this for 20+ years and you'll find that certain free wait exercises have to be replaced with machines (including the smith machine) due to shoulder issues etc.

well im only hal way there but i have had no issues with joints yet. you may be right but i hope not.

VinceRKG
12-04-2010, 04:17 PM
Now I am stuck on DB presses rather than Bar...What I am getting out of the article is that Bar will or free weights will work the delts more than a smith would...which I would think is the goal since you are using this movement to hit the chest anyway. So Smith would be better for isolating the chest in this workout....or is it smarter to do free bar bench for overall growth and width? Do they have a study on DB presses if it is hitting the same and working the same as free bar?

joe d
12-04-2010, 05:53 PM
edit. already posted

"Rodz"
12-04-2010, 11:40 PM
I gotta agree with P.S.
Free weights are great muscle builders because they not only work the muscle group being trained, but also the stabalizer muscles needed to keep the weight being moved on track. So in the instance of Bench Press Free vs smith, with the free weight movement, the delts, tri's and pecs all come into effect. However like P.S. stated, if you've ever had a shoulder injury, or are a more "senior" gym rat, its a lot easier to injure or reinjure yourself with the bench. So in order to continue making gains, but illiminating the risk factor many choose the smith over the free weight exercise. The free weight movement may limit the range a motion slightly, and may take a minute to line up correctly, but you can still make effective gains doing smith benches, smith shoulder presses, and smith squats.

Every exercise is not meant for every body type. What works for some wont work for all. Experimentation is key.
Peace!


quoted for truth