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Waylon
09-16-2012, 08:52 PM
"SHOULDER PREHAB EXERCISES

May 28, 2010 | By Lisa Marie Mercer

Rooted in pre-surgical physical therapy, prehab is a proactive exercise method designed to prevent injury. Shoulder prehab exercise programs often address lifestyle-related muscular imbalances such as rounded or hunched shoulders. These chronic postural imbalances cause faulty movement patterns, which increase susceptibility to injury. Prehab fitness programs incorporate traditional therapeutic exercises such as shoulder range of motion and rotator cuff strengthening exercises. Unlike traditional programs, which work large muscle groups and use heavier weights, prehab exercise strengthens and stretches the smaller muscle groups and uses minimal resistance.


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Rotator Cuff Exercises

An interactive network of muscles and tendons form the rotator cuff, which stabilizes the arm's attachment to the shoulder joint. Rotator cuff injuries, which may include impingement, inflammation or tearing, impede upper body functionality. Internal and external rotation exercises effectively "prehabilitate" the rotator cuff. Attach a resistance band to a stable object. Hold the band with the hand closest to the attachment point, and stabilize your elbow against your waistline. Keep a bent elbow as you move your forearm toward the body's midline. For external rotation, hold the band with the hand furthest from the attachment point, and rotate the forearm away from the body's midline. Perform 15 internal and 15 external rotations on each arm.

Rear Deltoid Exercise

The rear deltoid, or the back of the shoulder, is an underused muscle group. Slouching, sitting hunched at a desk or performing more chest than back exercises exacerbates the problem, causing the front of the shoulder to overwork, and the back of the shoulder to overstretch. The rear deltoid raise corrects this problem. Sit on a bench with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Hold one light weight with each hand. Avoid compensating with your lower back muscles by resting your chest on your thighs. Begin by bringing the weights together, underneath your legs. Keep your elbows slightly bent. Squeeze your shoulder blades toward each other as you raise your arms to shoulder height. Slowly return to the starting position. Perform three sets of 12 repetitions.


Medicine Ball Exercise

Dynamic flexibility, which is flexibility in motion, is crucial to shoulder health. Medicine ball exercises, performed against a wall, increase strength and range of motion. Begin with a three- to five-pound ball. Stand at arm's length from the wall, holding the ball in one hand. Press the ball against the wall, slightly below chest height. Slowly roll the ball up the wall, as high as you can can go without feeling pain. Perform eight repetitions. On the last rep, keep your arm in the elevated position, and perform eight clockwise and eight counterclockwise circles. Keep the movement small, as if you were tracing a silver dollar against the wall. The circular movement lubricates the joint, which prevents shoulder injuries.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/134041-shoulder-prehab-exercises/#ixzz26gSB1ZVL (http://www.livestrong.com/article/134041-shoulder-prehab-exercises/#ixzz26gSB1ZVL)"



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Curt James
09-16-2012, 09:11 PM
Rotator Cuff Exercises

An interactive network of muscles and tendons form the rotator cuff, which stabilizes the arm's attachment to the shoulder joint. Rotator cuff injuries, which may include impingement, inflammation or tearing, impede upper body functionality. Internal and external rotation exercises effectively "prehabilitate" the rotator cuff. Attach a resistance band to a stable object. Hold the band with the hand closest to the attachment point, and stabilize your elbow against your waistline. Keep a bent elbow as you move your forearm toward the body's midline. For external rotation, hold the band with the hand furthest from the attachment point, and rotate the forearm away from the body's midline. Perform 15 internal and 15 external rotations on each arm.

My favorites.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWE8vgMEcn8

Baldiewonkanobi
09-16-2012, 09:18 PM
About 10 years ago I thought I tore my rotator cuff. I went to Dr. Bill Stetson in Glendale, Ca. He was the first to perfect scoping the rotator cuff area. After my MRI it was confirmed that I had a small tear. Dr. Stetson told me these tears can repair on their own. To prevent further injury and calcification around the injury I would have to augment my upper body exercise. No more weight lifting for 90 days. He told me to join the local Y which had an adult lap swimming hour at 6am 7 days a week. He said to start slow 3 days a week. So it was swim M-W-F and leg train and/or stair climber cardio T-Th-Sat. In 90 days I was up to a mile on swim days and keeping my geezer legs in tact.

During the recovery period I did towel pulls and got massage, pinpointing trigger points in the back.

Nutrition included augmenting calcium, mag, D3, xtra C, fish oils, and chelated minerals. I still do this today plus I have added Glu/Cond/MSM and Hyaluronic Acid. I am 95% recovered stil today in that shoulder.

My current problem is inflamed traps/neck. Hurts like a mofo. I have not had a MRI. My regular Doc is also a Chiopractor. He has no answer. Cronic sore traps stems from a multitude of causes. Over use, micro tears from injury, arthritis in the neck, trapezius miralgia, stress (hunching of shoulders) and even a rare Cialis side effect. I am researching TB500 from our sponsor OstaGain with andetdotal 50% improvement end of 2 weeks. We shall see. I will acept any and all ideas.


Baldie

KTTraining
09-16-2012, 11:05 PM
Hi Curt , just a tip and assessment of your technique with external / internal rotation . During Internal / external rotation the objective is to strengthen the Subscapularis ( internal rotation ) and the Infraspinatis and Terrus Minor on external rotation . This is best done by fully rotating the Humerus while the Humerus is slightly abducted away from the body , not held close to the body . To do that simply place a folded up small Towel between your Oblique area and the inside of your bent arm .

When you do the exercise ( take Internal first) allow the weight to pull the hand a greater distance outward ( while elbow is held snug to the towel ) before rotating it all the way back in . This will create much greater rotation of the Humerus and , therefore, cause greater stimulation of the Subscapularis . For External Rotation you should move the same distance away from the cable , keep the folded towel between your arm and also allow the weight to pull your hand a much greater distance then that in the video , again , causing greater use of the External Rotators ; Infraspinatus and Terres minor .

Although it may not feel like it , I can see you are using a lot of Pec to maintain the weight and not fully rotating the Humerus outward .

The rep scheme should be variable just like that of a larger muscle . I would do 50 reps, then work down ; 40 , 30 , 20 , 10 and even a static hold with a relatively heavy weight .

There are other great exercises for the Supraspinatus . The Rhomboids and Serratus Anterior should also be exercised for total Shoulder stability .

Indian Clubs are an incredible way to strengthen the entire shoulder structure .

Hope you dont mind the suggestions. I've successfully rehabed my own shoulder injuries over the years and while working at a gym with a rehab facility with a great rep , actually enlightened some of the Therapy students doing internships at the place . Dealing with tweaks and injuries over the years and those of clients helped me learn quite a bit .

Curt James
09-16-2012, 11:13 PM
Thank you for those suggestions! ^^^^

KTTraining
09-16-2012, 11:33 PM
No problem . I was initially taught to do them as you are above but most good therapist today will abduct the arm with a pad or towel .

athleticvanessa
09-16-2012, 11:57 PM
I've used many of these exercises with minimal strength improvements, but I believe my main issue was not the joint itself, but actually stemming from nerve impingement. Super pain in the ass still, because it cause severe weakness and mild underdevelopment in growth when I trained them. I began receiving myofacial therapy every week to help reduce inflammation and swelling that was cause the pinched nerve to act out and it significantly helped in both my healing and physical appearance. My issue now though is the trouble with correcting any weakness in angles of my deltoids to prevent any further damage, but still being able to grow.

Hammerfit
09-17-2012, 04:15 PM
Great thread very informative!

DBowden
09-17-2012, 06:19 PM
Very interesting and useful information

Baldiewonkanobi
09-25-2012, 04:31 PM
Then reverse hands...


Baldie

axioma
09-26-2012, 12:38 PM
Great thread. Some of you might know that I have several operable tears in my shoulder/rotator. I opted not to have surgery for financial reasons, primarily, I am a massage therapist and A.R.T. practioner and couldn't afford 5 months off work,lol.
I implemented most of the protocols suggested here with great results.
As KTTraining suggests, decending reps over time is great, however you may not get to the point of heavy static holds, depending on severity of injury.
I do think controlled high rep sets, or more specifically FST-7 is always great to saturate specific area with blood.
Has anyone has any experience with platelet rich plasma injections?

"Rodz"
07-18-2013, 02:48 AM
This was worth bringing back up.

Do you guys do these before your chest and shoulder days?

I find when I do, I have almost pre-exhausted them and have a shitty workout.

F.I.S.T.
07-18-2013, 08:31 PM
Great read.Thanks.

lastson
07-18-2013, 09:39 PM
This was worth bringing back up.

Do you guys do these before your chest and shoulder days?

I find when I do, I have almost pre-exhausted them and have a shitty workout.

I do them before all upper body workouts, but don't feel pre-exhausted. Or maybe it just feels better than when I had rotator issues.. either way its nice to be warmed up

TopFormFitness
01-12-2014, 12:20 AM
Good thread, thanks... I picked up a couple of new ideas from here as well. My shoulders seem to be an area of weakness for me overall.

Here are some of the exercises I do to maintain scapular / shoulder stability... many of the same ones brought up here already:

http://top-form-fitness.com/fitness-blog/how-to-fix-shoulders/

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I try to do some of these before and after every upper body workout... I'll be adding a few from this thread now also!