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Frosty
05-29-2009, 01:56 AM
I know testosterone is made from cholesterol, but I also know that dietary cholesterol doesn't really affect serum cholesterol levels. So is there any affect of dietary cholesterol on testosterone levels? Or SHBG?

Tatyana
05-29-2009, 02:02 AM
Dietary cholesterol does affect serum cholesterol levels in some people.

If your cholesterol levels are really low, it is an indication of malnutrition, so yes, then it would affect testosterone levels, but lower levels would be more related to malnutrition.

More cholesterol is not going to mean more testosterone.

I haven't come across anything about cholesterol and SHBG.

Frosty
05-29-2009, 02:17 AM
If you eat a lot more dietary cholesterol, say if you ate 12-18 whole eggs a day, wouldn't that reduce the body's endogenous production of cholesterol? Would that make things "easier" on the body?

Tatyana
05-29-2009, 02:26 AM
If you eat a lot more dietary cholesterol, say if you ate 12-18 whole eggs a day, wouldn't that reduce the body's endogenous production of cholesterol? Would that make things "easier" on the body?

Not necessarily so.

Unlike glucose and insulin, the feedback mechanism for testosterone is not related to dietary intake.

Cholesterol is also used in every single cell membrane, the membrane of every subcellular organelle, to form myelin, for vitamin D, oestradiol, progesterone, aldosterone, cortisol as well as testosterone.

It is a not going to be directly correlated, cholesterol is far too ubiquitous.

freak
05-29-2009, 02:43 AM
from what i understand from class and readings is that your body has a genetic equilibrium of cholesterol that can only be manipulated a tiny bit through nutrition, or can be more highly influenced by drugs. so really, i dont think dietary cholesterol intake has a significant effect on blood levels.

and its effect on SHBG? havent heard anything either.

Tatyana
05-29-2009, 02:56 AM
from what i understand from class and readings is that your body has a genetic equilibrium of cholesterol that can only be manipulated a tiny bit through nutrition, or can be more highly influenced by drugs. so really, i dont think dietary cholesterol intake has a significant effect on blood levels.

and its effect on SHBG? havent heard anything either.

I know I can shift my cholesterol significantly through diet and exercise.

If I eat a lot of animal fat, like cheese and butter, it shoots up to around 8 mmol/L/310 mg/dl.

If I stop eating cheese and butter and have plant based fats, it drops back to 5 mmol/L/190 mg/dl within three months.

This may not be the case for everyone, but I would question pharma company funding the writing of textbooks.

Statin drugs are great for business, people are on them for decades and so many Americans don't like generic drugs.

freak
05-29-2009, 03:52 AM
I know I can shift my cholesterol significantly through diet and exercise.

If I eat a lot of animal fat, like cheese and butter, it shoots up to around 8 mmol/L/310 mg/dl.

If I stop eating cheese and butter and have plant based fats, it drops back to 5 mmol/L/190 mg/dl within three months.

This may not be the case for everyone, but I would question pharma company funding the writing of textbooks.

Statin drugs are great for business, people are on them for decades and so many Americans don't like generic drugs.
wouldnt that be due largely to trans-fat?

Frosty
06-01-2009, 12:26 AM
My intuition is saying to me that unadulterated, non-oxidized cholesterol in the diet would assist the body in that it reduces the requirement for manufacture of cholesterol for repair and cell membrane construction, and that reducing this load would "free up" the liver to do other things instead. This would require ingestion of raw egg yolks in order for them to be unadulterated and non-oxidized.

Thoughts on this?

Tatyana
06-01-2009, 12:38 AM
My intuition is saying to me that unadulterated, non-oxidized cholesterol in the diet would assist the body in that it reduces the requirement for manufacture of cholesterol for repair and cell membrane construction, and that reducing this load would "free up" the liver to do other things instead. This would require ingestion of raw egg yolks in order for them to be unadulterated and non-oxidized.

Thoughts on this?

Get some blood work done before and after and experiment on yourself.

That is what I do a lot of the time.

Frosty
06-01-2009, 12:44 AM
Get some blood work done before and after and experiment on yourself.

That is what I do a lot of the time.


How would I determine if it were making it easier on the body?

albaanderson86
03-29-2010, 06:50 AM
I think that people how are taking the Doctor advise for the cholesterol then it's better. other wises by our self we do then it cause the problem with us.

Stratford04
03-31-2011, 06:12 AM
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Thanks
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Will Brink
04-02-2011, 06:30 PM
I know testosterone is made from cholesterol, but I also know that dietary cholesterol doesn't really affect serum cholesterol levels. So is there any affect of dietary cholesterol on testosterone levels? Or SHBG?

Studies in that area have been conflicting from what I have read; some finding a correlation between total cholesterol and T, some not. I'm guessing within normal physiological ranges, cholesterol levels have minimal to no impact on T levels.

retwa
04-04-2011, 02:43 AM
Diets higher in saturated fat (and thus higher in dietary cholesterol) have been associated with increased testosterone production. But that doesn't mean that shoveling down ribeye steaks and whole eggs all day will give you better gains in the gym necessarily.

This issue would really only be of significant concern to a bodybuilder if he is perhaps under-consuming lipids, which are important for a number of bodily functions including cellular integrity, hormone production, and more. Most Americans get plenty of fats, but probably are deficient in omega 3 fats.

LookImDancinCrazy!
04-11-2011, 05:56 PM
Another issue one would really want to monitor if one wanted to consume higher amounts of cholesterol would be your bile flow and possibility of intra-hepatic lipid storage. Dietary cholesterol thickens the bile and can cause some problems pretty quickly if the liver is already stressed due to drugs and/or toxin burden. As for fatty liver, NAFLD is a hell of a lot more common than people imagine.