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  1. #1
    RX MEMBER FUZO's Avatar
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    Default Deadlifting: why is it important in Bodybuilding”

    Deadlifting: why is it important in Bodybuilding”

    This was written for www.fitnessgeared.com a bodybuilding fitness discussion forum, today’s discussion is “Deadlifting: why is it important in Bodybuilding”: Enjoy your reading

    For years, the deadlift has been the most feared exercise among bodybuilders, while it's been praised among powerlifters. But, what people sometimes forget is that the deadlift determines your strength and is a mass builder.
    Finnish bodybuilders and powerlifters use the deadlift because it's the true strength builder. The reason people might not do the deadlift is because of back injuries, might make a physique blocky, or they just don't want to do it.
    To me, the deadlift is my best exercise and I love it. I won't do a workout program without it, because without it, it becomes a missing link. I believe that highly in it.
    At first, beginners will think that the deadlift is much easier than the squat or bench press. But after a few weeks, they will love it or hate it. Nothing comes easy. And this is true when you talk about the deadlift. Reason why? Because the deadlift effects so much.


    Arrow Completing The Deadlift
    When you do the deadlift, it hits the back, the lats, the quads, the glutes, the arms and forearms, and even the abs. This proves that the deadlift produces more results than the bench press and the squats.
    Every time you do the deadlift, you get stronger. The feeling of getting stronger is the reason why I like the exercise other than the bench press and the squats. Not only are you getting stronger on the deadlifts, but you are also getting mentally stronger.
    The mental aspect plays a big part in the deadlift. When I go to deadlift, I tell myself that I am going to pull that weight, no matter what. Sometimes this is another reason why people don't do the deadlift; because it requires mental power which invites hard work.
    Enthusiasm from others can make a difference, maybe even a big difference, in your deadlift. But it all starts from believing you can do the lift. Like the bench press and the squat, there are variations. You can do the deadlift with dumbbells.


    The Benefits
    You can also use power racks for partial deadlifts which is beneficial for you deadlift. You can do more weight on the partials and the more weight you do, the more you can do on the regular deadlift. Also the more weight you do on either dumbbell deadlifts or partial deadlifts helps your mental strength also.
    For instance, if your max on the deadlift is 400, and you do partials with 420, try 405 the next time you max. But remember, both your mental and physical strength can make you move that 405. The deadlift is a great exercise for both powerlifters and bodybuilders. For powerlifters, it can make them stronger and even help them in the squat.
    But just like the squat or the bench press, they require just as much work, both mentally and physically. And if you can, try to enjoy it a little. Pulling heavy weight can be a great mental boost. The deadlift can do a lot, that's why it should be important.

  2. #2
    OLYMPIAN Ibarramedia's Avatar
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    Good post.
    "Don't make me angry. You wouldn't like me when I'm angry" -Dr. David Banner

    “Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart” - Anne Frank

  3. #3
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    The deadlift is definitely great, but the one thing I am struggling is determining which is better, the sumo or conventional?

    I read some articles such as:

    https://www.t-nation.com/training/de...s-best-for-you

    and

    http://deadliftworkouts.com/perform-...w-sumo-stance/

    but am still a bit confused if I would be sacrificing anything if I just stick with one permanently?

  4. #4
    OLYMPIAN black-elephant's Avatar
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    If you are focused on powerlifting, you will desire to identify your structural strengths and limitations. Once identified, you will better be able to choose conventional or sumo. However, from a bodybuilding perspective, you will likely desire to incorporate both into your training.
    Training and diet consulting available. Send me a PM.

  5. #5
    OLYMPIAN black-elephant's Avatar
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    One is curious how to develop thick back and traps without. A similar argument has been made that squats are not needed and leg presses can be used instead. However, one does not see the results of this theory with the lab AKA the gym. Please develop your premise and support.
    Training and diet consulting available. Send me a PM.

  6. #6
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    Great post!

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