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  1. #1
    OLYMPIAN
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    Default Question about strength

    Two weeks ago, I felt amazing in the gym.... Pretty much hit high numbers for all my lifts...Starting last week I felt tired, unmotivated and weak. My numbers fell 10-20 lbs for all lifts, I also feel very sore. This has happened in the past I am just wondering why it happens?? Does anyone else go through this? Sleep and nutrition has been consistent.

  2. #2
    OLYMPIAN
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    Take a look in the mirror. If you like what you see that's all that matters in my opinion.

  3. #3
    GeorgeForemanRules
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    You might need two weeks off.

  4. #4
    Managing Dir., Rx Muscle Forums Curt James's Avatar
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    ^^^ What GFR said.

    Quote Originally Posted by Minnphat View Post
    Two weeks ago, I felt amazing in the gym.... Pretty much hit high numbers for all my lifts...Starting last week I felt tired, unmotivated and weak. My numbers fell 10-20 lbs for all lifts, I also feel very sore. This has happened in the past I am just wondering why it happens?? Does anyone else go through this? Sleep and nutrition has been consistent.
    Causes

    By Mayo Clinic Staff

    Taking a quick inventory of the things that might be responsible for your fatigue is the first step toward relief. In general, most cases of fatigue may be attributed to three areas: lifestyle factors, medical conditions or psychological problems.

    Lifestyle factors

    Feelings of fatigue often have an obvious cause, such as:

    • Alcohol use or abuse
    • Caffeine use
    • Excessive physical activity
    • Inactivity
    • Lack of sleep
    • Medications, such as antihistamines, cough medicines and cold remedies
    • Unhealthy eating habits
    • Psychological conditions

    Fatigue is a common symptom of mental health problems, such as:

    • Anxiety
    • Depression
    • Grief
    • Stress
    • Medical conditions

    Unrelenting exhaustion may be a sign of a medical condition or underlying illness, such as:

    • Acute liver failure
    • Anemia
    • Cancer
    • Chronic fatigue syndrome
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • COPD
    • Emphysema
    • Heart disease
    • Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid)
    • Hypothyroidism
    • Medications, such as prescription pain medications, heart medications, blood pressure medications and some antidepressants
    • Obesity
    • Restless legs syndrome
    • Sleep apnea
    • Type 1 diabetes
    • Type 2 diabetes

    From http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/f...s/sym-20050894

    See anything that looks familiar? My vote would go with increased caffeine intake or OTC medicine of some kind.
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  5. #5
    OLYMPIAN data4's Avatar
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    Could simply be overtrained. If you felt really good previously and were able to push harder than usual, hit PRs etc. then that is very taxing on your muscular system and nervous system. You may just need to back off for a week to reset.

    That is assuming stress in your life is under control and not contributing to this.
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  6. #6
    OLYMPIAN
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    Thanks everyone.... Working 12 plus hours a day sometimes is taxing... I guess I need to deload some weeks, it just feels weird leaving the gym without completely taxing myself....

  7. #7
    OLYMPIAN
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    You might need two weeks off.



    What is your logic behind this? Why so much time? What are the benefits?
    Last edited by Minnphat; 01-24-2016 at 09:40 AM.

  8. #8
    Managing Dir., Rx Muscle Forums Curt James's Avatar
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    I'm not GFR but wouldn't it recharge your battery, fully rested, allow your central nervous system to say, "Okay, I'm not being attacked anymore."

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cent...system_fatigue
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  9. #9
    Moderator Mobster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by data4 View Post
    Could simply be overtrained. If you felt really good previously and were able to push harder than usual, hit PRs etc. then that is very taxing on your muscular system and nervous system. You may just need to back off for a week to reset.

    That is assuming stress in your life is under control and not contributing to this.
    This. When you get back in the gym try cycling up and down. Don't expect to max weight bench etc every time.
    06, 08, 09 and now 2010 British (4x) and 2008/2010 European Grip Champion (2x)

  10. #10
    OLYMPIAN black-elephant's Avatar
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    Strength as a single factor is a product of neurological stimulation. The message from the brain needs to fire the signal for the muscles to engage as well as estimate how much muscle is needed to create adequate force. If your central nervous system is being fatigued from any number of factors, strength will decrease. All of this is assuming your rest and nutrition remain the same.

    Rest and removal of unnecessary stress and stimulation (i.e. caffeine) will recharge.

    Nutrition under stress requires additional magnesium. Hard training and chronic stress deplete magnesium. As magnesium levels drop, the more reactive to stress one becomes and the higher one's levels of adrenaline. The elevated adrenaline further increases the lose of magnesium creating a potentially significant decline and downward spiral.
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  11. #11
    FREAK cook's Avatar
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    When I was my strongest competing in powerlifting I never did a set to failure.Always did a set number of reps and when things went well they would be easy every week and I always felt like I had a few more reps in me.I talked training with Mike Bridges once and asked him about that and he told me he had not missed a squat in something crazy like 3 years.This is certainly different than training to failure on every set as some do but for optimum strength it seems to be best to always leave a little in the tank.

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