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  1. #31
    BARBARIAN BROTHER joedemarco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnglicanBeachParty View Post
    I have been fighting a forearm injury for about 10 weeks.

    I think I originally either injured it while deadlifting or doing dumbell lateral raises. It was not too severe when it first happened, but has gradually gotten worse as the weeks went by.

    The sore muscle is the one that closes the fingers of my left hand. If I try to pick up even a light dumbell and bring it upwards (to the side or in front of me) it hurts like crazy.

    Just recently, I tweaked it doing high-pulley crossovers for my rear delts.

    It does not generally give me any trouble on biceps or triceps movements (except for hammer curls).

    Any advice for how to rehabilitate this?
    Question: where exactly are you getting your pain? Is it up near the elbow? Which portion of your forearm? Is the pain on the side of your little finger or thumb or right in the middle? Any details you can give would help. Thanks.

  2. #32
    RESURRECTED! AnglicanBeachParty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joedemarco View Post
    Question: where exactly are you getting your pain? Is it up near the elbow? Which portion of your forearm? Is the pain on the side of your little finger or thumb or right in the middle? Any details you can give would help. Thanks.
    The pain is right in the middle (or, rather, spread across the entire top of th forearm).

    If I hold my hands out straight in front of me, palms down, the pain is on top, starting just past the elbow, and going about 40% of the way toward my wrist.

  3. #33
    RESURRECTED! AnglicanBeachParty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joedemarco View Post
    Question: where exactly are you getting your pain? Is it up near the elbow? Which portion of your forearm? Is the pain on the side of your little finger or thumb or right in the middle? Any details you can give would help. Thanks.
    Okay, it looks like I was wrong about this being the muscle that causes my fingers to grip.

    Looking at the attached image, I believe the injured one is called the Brachioradialis ...

  4. #34
    BARBARIAN BROTHER joedemarco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnglicanBeachParty View Post
    Okay, it looks like I was wrong about this being the muscle that causes my fingers to grip.

    Looking at the attached image, I believe the injured one is called the Brachioradialis ...
    From your description I had a feeling you were talking about the brachioradialis...however I was a little confused when you mentioned the muscles that flex the fingers.

    You most likely have developed some tendinitis in that region. These type of soft tissue injuries can nag an athlete for weeks (if not months). Therefore, be patient....it will get better. Warm up the muscles well before performing any heavy sets. Also, avoid the specific exercises that directly increase pain to the area. Post workout, ice it down for 20 minutes.

    During the day, perform transverse friction rubs on the injured area. With your opposite hand, palpate the tender area of the brachioradialis. These fibers run vertically (when the arm is hanging by your side). Rub the tender fibers transversely with your fingers for 30-60 seconds at a time with a moderate amount of pressure. Do this several times during the day and also before you workout. It really helps increase the blood flow to the injured tissues.

    If the area gets worse or does not improve, ultrasound therapy by a therapist can really help. Good luck!

  5. #35
    RESURRECTED! AnglicanBeachParty's Avatar
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    Thanks, Doc!

  6. #36
    ARNOLD LIKE gman's Avatar
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    my chiro hyperextended my elbow in that arm, and my tendinitis went away within a couple of days after the second time he did it.

  7. #37
    BARBARIAN BROTHER joedemarco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gman View Post
    my chiro hyperextended my elbow in that arm, and my tendinitis went away within a couple of days after the second time he did it.
    Yes, chiropractics can manipulate extremities just like we manipulate the spine. Often times, an elbow, shoulder, etc. can be subluxated and can benefit from a manipulation. Thanks for the input, Mike!

  8. #38
    RX MEMBER Down4whatever's Avatar
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    Joe, have a question about an achilles issue.

    Whenever I grab my achilles tendon on my right foot and move my foot up and down, the tendon feels like a rope tightening......almost makes like a rubbing sound. I can feel it in my ankle; kind of like a vibration.

    It's been hurting pretty badly for about a week now, subsided over the weekend enough to do some running. I initially thought it was due to my new work shoes, but that would hurt both ankles. The whole ankle is now very swollen; any idea what I'm dealing with here?

  9. #39
    NOVICE Catwoman's Avatar
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    Joe

    I have read everything above about tendenitis and I am icing and wrapping it, but it still really hurts. I have it in my wrist and I feel pain in the inside os my wrist and occasionally up the back of my hand. Any other suggestions? I am not stopping training at this time either.

  10. #40
    BARBARIAN BROTHER joedemarco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Down4whatever View Post
    Joe, have a question about an achilles issue.

    Whenever I grab my achilles tendon on my right foot and move my foot up and down, the tendon feels like a rope tightening......almost makes like a rubbing sound. I can feel it in my ankle; kind of like a vibration.

    It's been hurting pretty badly for about a week now, subsided over the weekend enough to do some running. I initially thought it was due to my new work shoes, but that would hurt both ankles. The whole ankle is now very swollen; any idea what I'm dealing with here?
    Sounds like achilles tendonitis. The achilles tendon is the large tendon that attaches your calf muscles into your calcaneus (heel bone). The tendon often times can become irritated and inflamed. It's a pretty common overuse injury that occurs with individuals who perform a lot of activities such as running, walking, etc. (If you are over 40, you are even more susceptible because our tendons start to become less elastic.) The overuse causes inflammation that can lead to pain and swelling. Furthermore, achilles tendonitis can lead to small tears within the tendon, and make it susceptible to rupture.

    The two main causes are lack of flexibility and overpronation. I'm not sure how your flexibility is but the change of shoes could definitely be causing you to overpronate.



    Sometimes something as simple as an orthotic in your new shoes can help your foot if you are overpronating.

    In addition to trying an orthotic, stretching the achilles well and warming up properly before a run will definitely help. On days that it is really painful, don't aggravate it. Running on those days will only make it worse. If it is really inflamed, you may want to avoid running altogether until the inflammation subsides. Regular icing and over the counter anti-inflammatories will help reduce the inflammation. The ankle joints can also be manipulated by a chiropractor. I have had very good success with ankle injuries through manipulation.

    If it becomes really bad, physical therapy and possibly a cortisone shot may be your next step. Therefore, do what you can for it now before it escalates into a major problem. Good luck!

  11. #41
    BARBARIAN BROTHER joedemarco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catwoman View Post
    Joe

    I have read everything above about tendenitis and I am icing and wrapping it, but it still really hurts. I have it in my wrist and I feel pain in the inside os my wrist and occasionally up the back of my hand. Any other suggestions? I am not stopping training at this time either.
    Sending you a PM to discuss.

  12. #42
    RX MEMBER Down4whatever's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joedemarco View Post
    Sounds like achilles tendonitis. The achilles tendon is the large tendon that attaches your calf muscles into your calcaneus (heel bone). The tendon often times can become irritated and inflamed. It's a pretty common overuse injury that occurs with individuals who perform a lot of activities such as running, walking, etc. (If you are over 40, you are even more susceptible because our tendons start to become less elastic.) The overuse causes inflammation that can lead to pain and swelling. Furthermore, achilles tendonitis can lead to small tears within the tendon, and make it susceptible to rupture.

    The two main causes are lack of flexibility and overpronation. I'm not sure how your flexibility is but the change of shoes could definitely be causing you to overpronate.



    Sometimes something as simple as an orthotic in your new shoes can help your foot if you are overpronating.

    In addition to trying an orthotic, stretching the achilles well and warming up properly before a run will definitely help. On days that it is really painful, don't aggravate it. Running on those days will only make it worse. If it is really inflamed, you may want to avoid running altogether until the inflammation subsides. Regular icing and over the counter anti-inflammatories will help reduce the inflammation. The ankle joints can also be manipulated by a chiropractor. I have had very good success with ankle injuries through manipulation.

    If it becomes really bad, physical therapy and possibly a cortisone shot may be your next step. Therefore, do what you can for it now before it escalates into a major problem. Good luck!
    Thanks a mil, Joe!!

  13. #43
    NOVICE sulcop's Avatar
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    Joe, got a question for ya. I keep getting shooting pain down my left leg and into my foot. Starts in my lower back above the glute. Gets bad when I walk for cardio, but fine when I run or move faster. Its not holding me back from training, just hurts like a SOB!

  14. #44
    NOVICE sulcop's Avatar
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    Also the vest, gun belt and extra gear I carry does not help I am sure.

  15. #45
    BARBARIAN BROTHER joedemarco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sulcop View Post
    Joe, got a question for ya. I keep getting shooting pain down my left leg and into my foot. Starts in my lower back above the glute. Gets bad when I walk for cardio, but fine when I run or move faster. Its not holding me back from training, just hurts like a SOB!
    Sound like you're just getting f--king old, Sully...lol. (You know I can tease you cause I have a couple of years on you.)

    Is the lower back pain on the left side also? Is it tender to the left of your tailbone? You have a joint on each side where the tailbone meets the iliac bone called the S-I (sacro iliac) joint. It's a pretty common area of low back pain. You could be experiencing some pain radiating from this region due to a misaligned S-I joint. When the S-I joint becomes misaligned (subluxated) it can become "locked up" and lose it's ability to move properly. This type of problem can easily be addressed with a manipulation.

    The other possibility is that you have some nerve irritation due to some tight musculature in the hip/buttocks region. Nerves from the lower back that travel into the leg/foot must pass through the muscles of the hip/buttocks region. Tight muscles in this area can place pressure on the nerves causing nerve irritation resulting in pain into the leg, foot, etc. This can usually be resolved by deep tissue massage. Stretching may also help.

    A good stretch for the left side would be to sit on the floor and pull your left heel in towards your groin as far as possible. Then square to your right leg and stretch forward. You should feel this stretch the left glute/left S-I joint area. Use that stretch during your workout and definitely after you finish. In general, make sure you stretch after working out. I notice a lot of us older guys start to let our flexibility go to pot after we turn 40. You never want to stop working on flexibility.

    Oh, one last thing. I want you to get into the position below 3 times per day for one hour at a time:
    Attached Images Attached Images

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